Category Archives: Pilsners

Lervig Aktiebryggeri Pilsner

Rating:

21751378_748794995304648_2630002860554854469_n“This is the beer of the People. It was originally brewed for the locals, who lost a piece of their city when Carlsberg closed Stavanger’s only brewery in 2003. Our Pilsner is brewed with 100% Pilsner malts, Perle and Saaz hops, fresh German lager yeast, and carefully lagered to give the beer an authentic touch and clean finish.”

Served in a flute. It pours a nice straw golden colour with a slight haze. It generates a healthy three finger head which retains and weaves a blotchy lace down the walls of the glass.
Classic Noble hop qualities on the nose – earthy, herbal, a little spicy and a little floral around the edges too. Tucked in right behind is that crackery and somewhat grainy pilsner malt backing. Subtle undertones of cereal – corn flakes, rice bubbles etc. Classy.
Tasting more of the malts in flavour. Grain, crackers and cereal come through with a gentle line of earthy hops cutting down the middle. The malts offer a mild sweetnees midway and set up for a nice smooth and refreshing finish with touches of earthy herbal hop on the rear.
It’s light, reasonably crisp and crushable in the mouth. Medium-high co2 with mild-moderate body.
An all round session beer this one. Light in ABV (4.7%) and seriously easy to put back. Certainly more in your traditional style with those old world ingredients really putting on a show. Just a tasty and well brewed pilsner. Solid offering from Lervig.

Little Creatures Original Pilsner

Rating:

20708352_732748070242674_4470078677141151258_n“We love hops, so it seemed natural to move the Pilsner towards the North German (Friesland) Style – these are hoppier and more bitter then the Southern German Pilsners. It’s made with 100% Pilsner Malt and German Perle hops – the key to this Beer is to let the aroma and bitterness of the hops shine through. The Beer really delivers on flavour, which is a creeper – this is a warning – the beer has an uncompromising and earth shattering bitterness; hell yeah …”

Served in a flute. Clear golden pour with an off-white head which offers limited retention and lacing.
Good presentation of the Perle hops here. The subtle yet floral and spicy notes are quite direct with this firm pilsner malt structure in support. Smelling mighty fresh and green with a herbal scent being countered by the grainy honey sweetness that’s being brought out by the malts. Nice and simple with good overall balance.
It does taste like the brewers have taken the traditional German approach with the somewhat spicy and herbaceous Perle hops at an even keel with the semi sweet and grainy pilsner malt. The hop bitterness just edges forward through the mid before those hallmark rice cracker flavours lead in to the crisp, mildly bitter and grassy finish.
Light, clean and refreshing in the mouth. Mild-moderate body with a slightly lifted hop bitterness. Pretty much true-to-style.
Lovely representation. The pilsner by LC is one that we’ve passed on numerous occasions but have never bagged. No real reason why, could have something to do with the sale to Lion Nathan all those years ago but we have to give credit where credit is due. This is a decent and super sessional pilsner.

Sawmill Brewery Pilsner

Rating:

image“Biscuity pilsner malt and distinctive Motueka and Riwaka hops bringing aromas of lemon and lime. Nelson Sauvin for a tart gooseberry hit. Straw coloured appearance, brilliantly clear, with a long lasting white head. Crisp and bitter. Medium dry finish.”

Served in a flute. Relatively clear golden appearance with just the slightest haze. It knocks up a modest finger of head which holds up quite well, working a healthy lace as it ebbs.
There’s just something about kiwi hops that work particularly well with pilsners. The hop bill is made up of Riwaka, Motueka and Nelson Sauvin – the two previous (being bred from European Saaz hops) bring a distinct green and fresh citrus and herb character while the Nelson Sauvin offers a somewhat lemony somewhat tart berry profile. Nice grainy/biscuity malt base being incorporated as well.
In the mouth it’s crisp and zingy with a vibrant Co2. Light on and effortless in the swallow. Good amount of hop bitterness coming on as well.
It presents a good splash of hop character upfront: zesty citrus, gooseberry and white grapes with the dry but clean grainy malt in tow. The bitterness really kicks in to gear mid way, reaching well in to the clean finish where we find light notes of grapefruit and pine offering good length in the tail.
We may be hop heads but we like our pilsners leaning more on the traditional side. Just a little too heavy on the hops here….that’s in no way a negative though…just our personal opinion. On merits it’s a light, crisp and sessional pilsner that’s super easy to put back. Not bad.

Alesmith Brewing Co. ‘Spezial’ Pilsner

Rating:

18922090_704243733093108_2866515640618994127_n“Inspired by classic European lagers, our entire Brewing Team got together to create this truly collaborative beer that captures the essence of European tradition. The result, Spezial Pils, is our take on a German-style pilsner with a pleasant balance between light, grainy malt and spicy, floral hops. We lager it at freezing temperatures for an extended period to round out its delicate flavors and improve drinkability. The finish is crisp and clean with a pleasant dryness and subtle bitterness. Prost!”

Served in a footed flute. Quite a hazy straw golden hue meets the eye. It’s topped off by a finger of tightly held foam that gradually peels off to a wispy film. Healthy lace.
Not a great deal of variation on the nose, nevertheless what is here lifts out of the glass with real vigour. A hefty Hallertau spiciness is backed up by a brawny floral bouquet. A prominent cereal malt structure also comes through to balance. Fleeting hints of herbal hop and subtle citrus peek in but it’s all pretty traditional in its delivery.
Yes, we sound like a broken record but the mouth feel is clean and crisp with a smooth overall texture. Mild bitterness (25 IBU) with just the right amount of carbonation. Light-moderate body.
Excellent transition on to the palate. The spicy and floral hops present well above the semi sweet and at times grainy pilsner malts. Nice line of bitterness through the middle as an undertone of straw carries a herbaceous note in to the slightly dry and spicy finish.
We acknowledge that the yanks love to modify and redefine styles, this is why we’re impressed by the classic character of this pilsner. Simple aromas and flavours….but done perfectly. Kudos Alesmith this is a lovely drop.

Speights Triple Hop Pilsner

Rating:

18622315_695600070624141_3255865939303436608_n“A real pilsner true to its traditions, Triple Hop Pilsner uses three distinct hops; one for bitterness at the beginning and two for aroma added later in the brew. The moment you spark up the barbecue is the moment to take the top off a Triple Hop Pilsner, perfect beer match with anything from the sea; snapper or cod you choose.”

Bought from the resort mini Mart in Denarau, Fiji. Served in a flute. Pouring a bright golden hue with 100% clarity. It knocks up a frothy two finger head that holds its shape, allowing it to work a healthy lace down the walls of the glass.
The nose is displaying plenty of Noble hop florals with quite a sweet, syrupy malt structure. Getting hints of DMS and boiled veggies creeping in along with a kind of wet cardboard scent that’s a little unfavourable. This beer has come from NZ so we’re thinking it hasn’t travelled well. Some pleasant earthy hop, subtle spice and a soft herbal note ties it all up.
Super crisp and refreshing in the mouth. Light on and a little thin with a vibrant Co2. Mild body. A real summery thirst quencher here.
Flavour-wise it’s pretty stock standard. Spicy and floral hop notes on the fore, filling out with the semi sweet bready malts. Tasting a somewhat earthy bitterness before it concludes with a crisp, clean finish.
Like the rest of the “craft options” or shall we just say premium imported beers here it’s good for one thing….quenching thirst. It’s definitely a more traditional Czech interpretation and the 4% ABV would reflect that. Just your run of the mill pilsner.

Hop Nation Brewing Co ‘The Damned’ Pilsner

Rating:

18342311_688519407998874_884474349464353137_n“The origins of the Pilsner date back to the mid-19th century in Bohemia – now emcompassing modern day Czech Republic – a part of the world also known for its gothic mythology. Perhaps those blood-thirsty vamps could have taken it easy with a little Pilsner to quench their thirst – less drama that way.”

Served in a footed flute. Slightly hazy golden body that’s capped off with a thumb of rocky white head. It holds its shape well and works a healthy lace as it ebbs.
The nose is nice and spicy with a good lick of citrus in support. Getting some light floral perfumes pushing through along with a very mild honey sweetness. Somewhat of a grainy malt backing that reveals a bit of earthiness in its delivery. Not bad at all, certainly a new world interpretation.
Quite highly carbonated which hands the texture a really fizzy effervescence. The body is light on with a fairly subdued bitterness. A super sessional number.
Getting a strange peppery hay flavour upfront. Similar notes of straw, grains and an adjunct bready malt pretty much drown out any discernible citrus character. Picking up some earthy hops late in the mid as it leads in to a dry and delicate finish which offers a slightly toasty character on the back.
Is it a reasonable drop? Yeah. Is it memorable? No, not really. The summer of 2016/17 saw quite a lot of pilsners hit the shelves and unfortunately this one falls victim to being a tad too run of the mill. Nice aroma, ok mouth feel but the flavour was a bit of a let down. Average.

Moo Brew Pilsner

Rating:

18118802_681836182000530_4249610235534191737_n“Our Pilsner redefines the classic lager, challenging the cherished belief that they can only be made in Pilsen. Traditionally, it required a cool climate for the cold ferment and lagering, soft water for a long ferment, and the noble saaz hops. Improved clarity, golden colour and a flavour sensation is the result. In Tasmania’s perfect climate, with its pristine soft water, Moo Brew Pilsner departs from the established tradition by using only German Spalt hops to achieve its unique aroma and lingering bitterness. Celebrate its fine creamy head, crystal clarity and golden colour with oysters, lobster, fine fish or goats’ cheese.”

Served in a footed flute. It hits the glass with a reasonably clear golden hue. A thumb of loosely packed bubble emerges before it steadily reduced to a film. Laces well as it subsides.
The nose is about as traditional as one could get outside of the Czech republic. It’s subtle and grainy with a spicy, peppery hop profile in support. Some earthy elements coming through but it’s slightly more woody in its delivery. Undertones of floral pot pourri and a cracker malt at the base. Lovely stuff.
Crisp, light and refreshing in the mouth. Somewhat mineraly in texture. Sparkling Co2 with a mild bitterness developing late. A sessional little number thus far.
We’re seeing more of the noble hop qualities presenting in flavour. Kind of herbaceous upfront with hints of peppery spice and a light bready malt which progresses through the mid. A bit spicy and bit grassy as it leads in to a crisp, snappy finish that offers a dry earthy note on a length.
Solid pilsner. In a market where new world interpretations are dominating this one winds back the clock with a very traditional malt and h

Hawkers Beer Pilsner

Rating:

18010566_679768122207336_4345616460908699371_n“Not the usual watered down industrial lager, this beer is clean, refreshing but never boring. Robust, full-bodied malt character at the beginning with an assertive bitter finish.”

Served in a flute glass. Clear, light golden hue with a thumb of fluffy white head forming on top. Retention is good, posting a set of rings as it recedes.
The aroma is light and crisp but also bold with a big impression of floral perfumes, pot pourri, peppery spice and herbal hops. A sturdy malt structure imparts a sweet honey note that’s reinforced with hints of white bread. Superb! Reserving the light, snappy characters of a pilsner but it comes at us with plenty of vigour. Loving this.
Crisp (there’s that word again), refreshing and light in the mouth. Zippy carbonation with a mild-moderate body. 45 IBU is well presented with a dry consistency throughout.
Lovely transition on to the palate with a good showing of floral hops, herbs and pepper on the fore. It drops in to a delicious malty sweet note through the mid developing a certain bready note before it’s wrapped up with a crisp, dry finish that provides spicy hop notes on the rear.
It has become quite clear that Hawkers simply can’t brew a bad beer. Furthermore we’re confident in saying that this is one of, if not, the best Aussie pilsner we’ve tried. As far as new world interpretations go this is right up there. Brilliant drop.

The Grifter Brewing Co ‘Bright Eye’ Pilsner

Rating:

17554451_666678116849670_4514787722073509620_n“A light refreshing pilsner, paired with earthy and citrus New Zealand hops. Embrace the “new world” of pilsner”

Served in a footed flute glass. Bright Eye offers a light milky yellow appearance with a solid two finger head taking shape on top. Good retention, working a nice lace as it ebbs.
The aroma certainly projects from a new world angle as the tangy citrus hops lead out with lemon and lime pulp. Hints of fresh herbs and earthy spice work their way in to the more traditional grainy malt base. Definitely getting cracker biscuits and pepper beginning to unfold as it settles in.
The texture follows suit with a light, crisp and bang-able mouth feel. Fine carbonation with just a trace of hoppy bitterness developing in the swallow.
The citrusy hop presents itself willingly on the fore. A dash of zippy lime juice and a touch of pepper cut through the grainy malts as a taste of hay and crackers forms late in the mid. Delicate and easy finish with a suggestion of grassy herbs in the tail.
We admit we loved it more when we had it on tap at the brewery but it’s still crisp, fresh and uber approachable. It’s actually on the lower end of the scale in terms of ABV (4.4%) so it slides right in to that sessional category that’s full flavoured and goes the distance. This is Grifters first canned release so we’ll be eagerly looking forward to their next.

Garage Project ‘Hops On Pointe’ Champagne Pilsner

Rating:

17342586_663796537137828_36917826714553177_n“Beer and ballet – an unusual Pas de Deux. Brewed by Garage Project for the Royal New Zealand Ballet, Hops on Pointe teases the boundaries between high and low culture.Brewed with premium German malts, Nelson Sauvin hops and finished with a champagne yeast, the result is a pale gold lager with a crisp, clean palate, rich tropical fruit aromas and tight champagne bubbles. Available at all good barres.”

Served in a footed flute glass. Uncommonly hazy with a bright chiffon yellow hue. It whips up a nice two finger head that steadily reduces to a film with a healthy lace sticking to the glass.
Quite citric on the nose, really displaying those heady lemon citrus characters so synonymous with champagne. The brewers have done a fantastic job offsetting it with the grainy, cracker biscuit malt while the subtle spicy and resinous hops work quietly in the background. Nice touch.
The mouth feel is light on and crisp with a spritzy champagne fizz. Definitely not hiding the 6.7% ABV as it hits the palate with a bit of prickly heat. Fairly bitter in the swallow.
Getting a really direct warmth with sharp citric bitterness on the front. Grapefruit stands out but it’s softened by a mild bready malt midway. The Nelson Sauvin hops impart a hint of white grapes and vines as it sets up the long, dry and extremely bitter finish.
We can see what they were trying to accomplish here, the combination of champagne yeast, German malt and Nelson Sauvin hops is brilliant. Their downfall, in our opinion, is the excessive presence of alcohol and the intensity of the bitterness, particularly on the back end. We’ve recently found that the further a pilsner is taken from its traditional roots the less favourable it becomes. We guess it’s just one of those styles that shouldn’t be altered….too much.

Deschutes Brewery: Pub Reserve Series ‘Pilsner Pie’

Rating:

17155209_659297030921112_8129967155433578261_n“Pilsner aged with key lime in pinot casks for 4 months.
Part of our small batch, Pub Reserve series. Available only at our pubs and tasting room.”

Served in a footed flute glass. Slightly hazy golden pour with elevated Co2 streaming up to maintain this surging four finger head. Excellent retention allows for a healthy lace trail as it ebbs.
Getting a really big impression of candied lime, vanilla, cream and tart citrus. Also picking up subtle hints of crushed nuts with that traditional cracker biscuit malt at the base. Really impressive how they’ve incorporated the aromas of key lime pie in to the pilsner characters, could be a little better balanced but the tart lime and vanilla make for a very pleasant and moreish aroma.
The mouth feel is crisp but also frothy with vibrant Co2 and a spiky acidity across the tongue. The 5.8% ABV is well hidden behind the direct lime tartness.
Good continuation on to the palate with the tart and slightly sugary lime aspect. It’s actually well countered by the creamy vanilla that works in and takes some of the acidic edge off. Not getting a lot in the way of traditional pilsner flavours as the dominant lime notes carry in to the clean and citrusy finish.
Look, by no means is it a bad beer, the novelty factor is brilliant and they’ve executed that element well but it’s very one-dimensional and the lime flavour does become a little overwhelming by the end. Definitely one to share and the 750ml bottle supports that. Not bad but not great either.

Kereru Brewing ‘AT-AT’ Imperial Pilsner

Rating:

17201250_656125421238273_1243508612746458342_n“Imperial At-At Pilsner is a huge beer and dangerously smooth drinking. Perfectly balanced between malt and hops, with intense notes of bitter and sweet. Serve at 8-10°C.”

Served in a footed flute glass. This absolute beast of a pilsner pours a bright golden hue with remarkable clarity. It generates a short white head that retains well as it works a healthy lace down the walls of the glass.
Surprisingly discreet on the nose. Not getting a great deal of traditional pilsner elements but what we are uncovering are hints of juicy white grapes, astringent alcohol, herbs, floral hops, pepper and some really strange scent that comes off a bit like glazed pear. Points for its unique character but it’s definitely a bit out there.
The mouth feel is somewhat light with moderate Co2. Very warming with a direct burn that gradually intensifies in the swallow. A bit of hoppy bitterness creeping in, accentuating the booze in the process. Ooph…Not a lot of balance here but we guess at 10.2% ABV that wouldn’t be easy.
Gee wizz the front palate cops an absolute thrashing with astringent booze and a sweet honeyed malt. The middle also gets the same treatment with little else coming through. It only gets worse too…by the time it finished it tastes like we’ve just sipped on pure methylated spirits.
Terrible. There’s a point where you push the ABV to in some styles and I think we just went way past the threshold here. We don’t see the point in brewing a beer so strong that it literally cancels out any other possible flavour in the beer. We hate to say it but this is a drain pour. Awful.

Balter Brewing Company Pilsner

Rating:

16997693_652109148306567_4787396971353210330_n (1)“Modern craft beers offer an epic variety of intense flavours. But, sometimes you want a drink that’s simple and refreshing. Sometimes you want a ‘beer beer’. Enter the Balter Pilsner – our third tinnie and second full-time flavour.”

Served in a footed flute glass. She presents a lovely clear golden complexion with a frothy two finger head taking shape on top. It peels back to a collar with a reasonably good lace trail being left behind.
The aroma certainly has some lager qualities to it along with some of the more traditional pilsner characters like grains and honey as well. May be just a hint of peppery spice which leads us to believe that Euro Saaz and or Noble hops have been used. Undertones of straw, light florals, herbs and a subtle skunky note rounds it out. We’re a little undecided with this one.
Really nice and rounded mouth feel. Slightly mineraly in texture with good uplift from the Co2. Mild-medium body.
The palate definitely leans more on the lager side with a firm sweet malt and yeasty alcohols present from go to woe. Some hop spiciness comes through with a touch of floral pot pourri and a hint of that unpleasant skunky-like flavour in the finish.
We wanted to like it, we really did, but we were expecting more pilsner characters. We’re not entirely sure what pilsner category it would even fall in to as it doesn’t seem to be in Czech or German style. To us it’s more of a typical Australian lager. Sure it was crisp, bang-able and refreshing but it just didn’t win us over.

Bacchus Brewing Co. White Chocolate Pilsner

Rating:

16807674_648905755293573_8230492141102237965_n“We have taken our classic Czech Pilsner recipe and infused with chocolate and vanilla. The beer has a wonderful white chocolate nose that carries on in to the taste and then finishes with a nice firm bitterness that balances the sweet chocolate perfectly.”

Served in a footed flute glass. It pours a hazy amber hue with a fair bit of suspended sediment floating around. The head swells to about two fingers before collapsing to a ring with minimal lace on the glass.
Definitely get those gorgeous creamy white chocolate notes on the nose initially. The balance is superb, tucked right in behind the white chocolate are the traditional Pilsner characters – grainy malts, slightly floral hops and crackers. Uber moreish aroma. White chocolate and vanilla Pilsner?! What a unique combination that works incredibly well.
The texture is light and crisp with a fairly decent body filling it out. Co2 is energetic and the IBU probably sits around the mid 30’s.
Flavour-wise it presents as much more of a Pils with the floral/herbal hops and grainy malts upfront. A hint of vanilla comes in and out as a soft bitterness makes way for the decadent white chocolate to finish it off. Nice duration, really loving the balance between the creamy chocolate and the bitterness on the back palate.
Seriously classy stuff. The marriage of white chocolate and vanilla with the crisp and grainy characters of a Pilsner is simply genius. The two go together like peas in a pod. Far better than the raspberry and white choc Pils which, to us, seemed dominated by the tart raspberries. This one is perfectly balanced and delicious. Another top drop from Bacchus.

Murray’s Brewing Co ‘Rudeboy’ Pilsner

Rating:

16473809_641147226069426_3991399028559475253_n“Rudeboy is Murray’s interpretation of Pilsner made vaguely in the Czech style but with a New World twist. It pays homage to European brewing tradition using the old school lager brewing process of cold fermentation and extended conditioning periods, but the extensive late hopping takes this Pilsner in its own direction.”

Served in a footed flute glass. Rudeboy pours a slightly hazy pale golden hue with a finger of off white head capping off. It settles to a wispy film that weaves a wet and streaky lace as it ebbs.
The nose is lovely, light and crisp, really showcasing those luscious green NZ hops. Wafts of zesty lime juice, guava and vinous herbs are also pushing up in support. Beneath it is the clean cereal malt base that works itself in beautifully and hands the aroma a good contrast. Terrific stuff here from Murray’s.
As expected the texture is light and flowing but slightly beefed up with a medium body. Co2 is moderate with just the right amount of bitterness.
Nothing rude in flavour either – it opens up with a super clean grassy/herbal hop character that reveals traces of cereal malt laced through. It holds its shape quite well as it surpasses the mid picking up suggestions of citrus as it leads to a crisp, clean and mildly dry finish. Length is reasonable, refreshing green and grassy on the back palate.
We couldn’t have chosen a better beer for this scorching hot Sydney summer day if we tried. The crisp and refreshing hops paired with the clean, dry malts are just what the doctor ordered. Cracking beer….we’ll be making a return to this that’s for sure.

Stone/Arrogant Brewing ‘Wussie’ Pilsner

Rating:

16427305_641147232736092_2942101193880119744_n“For far too long the tyrannical industrialized beer overlords have disgraced and cheapened the noble heritage of the pilsner with their relentless multi-generational downward drive to commercialized homogenization. Over decades, this once vaulted style has been slowly and methodically gutted, bringing forth a soulless and anemic result, all the while spending billions in advertising to convince the unwitting public that their fizzy yellow end result was beer. Well, I will not have it. We are striking back for true craft by stealing the pilsner back from their evil clutches, and restoring it to its almighty glory. They do it cheaply. We do it right. Choose vapidity, or choose righteousness…but whatever you do, choose wisely.”

Served in a footed flute glass. The pour offers a bright golden glow with a slight haze. It generates a thumb of tightly held foam that peels off and settles to a fine overlay. Laced reasonably well.
Good balance of traditional and new world elements on the nose. We certainly get those spicy and floral noble hop qualities with undertones of citrus and grass working in the background. Quite a big malt profile actually…bigger than the hops anyway with grainy, bready and cereal notes presenting. Maybe it’s just us but we’re also getting a sweet sherbet/cotton candy-like scent to it as well. Quite nice indeed.
The moderate body definitely benefits from the vibrant Co2 while that new world feel comes through with the active 47 IBU’s that grab the back of the throat. Texture is crisp, dry, maybe a bit metallic.
The grainy cereal malts show up initially, making way for the spicy and citrusy hops to inject its bitterness midway. Spicy herbal hops dance with the grainy malts on its way to a dry and grassy finish with a subtle warmth from the booze (5.8%) on the rear.
It’s a good craft Pilsner, we could be wrong but we think this is Stone’s first crack at this style. If so, it’s a damn fine representation. Props for this can too….Brilliant artwork on show here. Solid drop.

Tuatara Brewing ‘Mot Eureka’ NZ Pilsner

Rating:

15965082_628679753982840_1910897717690106553_n“Long ago in 2001, we had a eureka moment. We’re miles away down here, so why copy their beers? Using all local hops from the Motueka area, we perfected this 100% NZ Pilsner. Crisp, firm bodied with notes of citrus, it spawned a whole new style of beer, now proudly sent offshore to faraway places like Europe.”

Served in a footed flute glass. Mot Eureka pours a bright golden hue with stunning clarity. It’s capped off with an extremely well retained three finger head that leaves a healthy set of rings as it ebbs.
NZ Pilsners are fast becoming a favourite for us. We reckon it’s part due to the hops, in the case of this Pilsner they’ve used the Motueka hop (among others) which is a cross-breed with the Saaz hop so naturally it fits in perfectly with this style of beer. Aromas of lime, citrus, herbs and white wine give the beer a distinctly green character. Awesome stuff.
The texture is crisp, dry and bubbly. The 44 IBU is slightly inflated and it’s definitely felt in the mouth. Good carbonation, light-moderate body.
A swish around the mouth offers a lush mix of fresh herbs, zippy citrus and hints of pomelo. A restrained malt base hints at grainy and slightly toasty notes in its delivery as it leads in to the citric and bitter finish. Nice duration, almost has an IPA-like bitterness on the back palate.
The brewers reveal that this beer is a revamped version of the Bohemian Pilsner they used to brew way back when. We remember reviewing that as well and we can say that this version is considerably hoppier than its predecessor. Still very nice, one to surely please the hop heads though. Fine offering.

Bayerische Staatsbraurei Weihenstephan Pils

Rating:

15871863_628249800692502_6244640824128055960_n“Golden-yellow and bright, with 30 bitter units and quite hoppy compared to most of the other Pilsners our Weihenstephaner Pils comes up with a distinctive aroma of hops with a pleasant bitterness. This combination provides a balanced mix and guarantees great enjoyment. Brewed according to our centuries-old brewing tradition on the Weihenstephan hill.”

Served in a footed flute glass. The pour offers a light golden complexion that’s as clear as day. It generates a short white head that settles to a film with some blotchy lace left in its wake.
The aroma is brilliantly balanced and super clean. Unlike the new world Pilsners, which we’ve been having a lot of lately, the malts present a bit more so the grains, hay, crackers and sweet doughy notes are promoted ahead of the somewhat earthy and grassy hops. A good swirl of the glass summons a kind of powdery floral perfume as well. Not bad.
The beer is very nice and accommodating in the mouth. Smooth and light in texture but with enough Co2 to save it from being too lean. Mild bitterness (30 IBU). Light-moderate body. Very bangable.
Malts are dominating in flavour too – honeyed crackers, hay and buttered white bread benefit from a very subtle line of hoppy bitterness. Some mild earthy tones come through as the hops hint at a touch of grass while the finish is light and sweet with only the faintest trace of dryness on the back end.
We really enjoyed this. It’s actually quite interesting returning to a traditional German Pils. As we mostly reach for Czech Pilsners the differences, although subtle, are not only contrasting but a welcome change for the palate. Lovely drop.

Kereru ‘Big Pigeon’ Pilsner

Rating:

15826103_625572690960213_1226223652914062593_n“Big Pigeon Pilsner is a clean, crisp pilsner made with premium malt and cold-conditioned for weeks until matured, boldly flavoured with noble hops for bittering, and for a bright finish: Nelson Sauvin and Motueka hops.”

Served in a footed flute glass. The appearance offers a pale and hazy golden hue with a finger of fluffy snow white foam capping it off. The head is maintained quite well and weaves a fine lace as we imbibe.
We’ve enjoyed somewhat of a resurgence with Pilsners this summer and it’s directly due to new world interpretations like this from Kereru. The nose provides a traditional grainy/cracker malt base beneath a lifted citrus and slightly herbal overtone thanks to the use of Nelson Sauvin and Motueka hops. It’s also quite grassy with hints of white grapes and very subtle lemon zest.
As to expected the texture is light on, crisp and effortless in the swallow. Nicely carbonated with a surprisingly firm bitterness forming in the tail.
A big blast of grassy hops, citrus and fresh herbs meet the front palate. The sturdy bitterness we mentioned before pairs up with the grainy and slightly honeyed sweetness through the mid as it finishes dry, crisp and grassy with an assertive bitterness drawing out on the back end.
This Pilsner is our first crack at this breweries range and we must admit it’s a pretty good way to kick off proceedings. Not only for this brewery but also for 2017!

Bridge Road Brewers Enigma Pilsner

Rating:

15726866_620785711438911_7721876802124728973_n“This pilsner has been brewed as an Australian take on the craft pilsners of NZ. A light bodied lager heavily hopped with the Australian hop variety Enigma.”

Served in a footed flute glass. The pour offers a pale golden colour with a nice and puffy two finger head that eventually settles to a thick overlay which dispenses a smattering of lace down the walls of the glass.
We really dig this idea of the Enigma hop being generously used in a new world pilsner. Two reasons – one; it’s a direct descendant of the European Tettnang hop so its background fits in perfectly with the style of beer being brewed and two; it possesses a subtle but lovely citrus bouquet with traces of white grapes and herbs. The aroma also provides a mild earthy tone along with hints of hay and grains. Very nice.
The mouth feel is vibrant and mineraly in texture. The Co2 level is spot on and the body sits around the mild-medium mark.
The Enigma hop is showcased well in flavour too – especially upfront where the mild bitterness blends with the light citrus and herbs. The flavour of the hop holds up well across the mid as a slight grainy malt gets introduced delivering a crisp, dry and grassy finish that reveals a touch of hay on the rear.
Delicious pilsner here folks, a certain step up from their chestnut pilsner which seemed to miss its mark for us. The Enigma hop really is the champion of the beer with its lovely citrus sweetness and subtle herbal/grassy undertones. Lovely drop.